Es gibt Kuchen _ Hermann zu Gast 

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exponential growth of Hermann


Hermann is a dough that functions as chain letter.

He was born for many reasons:

 

Can Hermann raise people's interest in exhibited results?

 

Can Hermann tell about the ponential growth and the enlargement of volume?

 

Can Hermann (re)connect people?

 

Can Hermann survive in the presence/absence of the artist?


A statement by Hermann about exponential growth.

Within the context of my diploma project, I decided to research about the social infrastructure of the county I studied in, named Saarland. Saarland is one of the smallest counties in Germany and there is rumour (like in other small regions), that everyone know each other. So, if there is a problem to solve, one talks to their neighbour and either the person can help themselves, or they know someone who knows someone... Wanting to find out if this is true, I decided to start a chain letter by the help of a dough. The dough needs to be taken care of for 10 days. One needs to feed (milk, flour, sugar) and stir it before it can be split into 5 parts. One remains with the person who took care of it (to become a cake), the four other parts are given to friends and family. Its exponential growth would have been enough to cover the whole area with dough within 100 days. My project was running for 140 days which would have been enough to cover whole Germany with this dough called Hermann. Next to the dough, I also handed out instructions on how to take care of Hermann and an introduction to the project. I asked people to send me their addresses to be able to detect where the dough had travelled and to be able to invite everyone who was participating to the exhibition, at the end of the project. Via Facebook, I shared the latest recipes which I created every 10 days and gave an overview of where Hermann had travelled. Besides the curiosity about the social infrastructure of Saarland, I was also wondering whether participants would be more interested in visiting an end of the year exhibition (ideas about what can be called art are rather conservative in this area). To make the whole exhibition more appealing, I promoted the 14 frozen cakes which I had made within the 140 days and announced they would be offered to everyone who would come to see the exhibition.